Assisted Stretching Demo: Traction to Improve the Squat

by Chris Frederick |  Date Released : 06 May 2013

Chris Frederick demonstrates a powerful technique that is not used in traditional stretching: traction. This demo teaches how and when to perform this Fascial Stretch Therapy technique to help improve the squat.

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Chris Frederick

About the author: Chris Frederick

Chris Frederick is a Kinesis Myofascial Integration practitioner and has been a physical therapist for 24 years. He has also taught qigong and tai chi and is a long-term practitioner of those arts. Chris’ practice is focused on manual therapy, prehab/rehab exercise prescription, 1-on-1 assisted individual stretching & group stretch instruction. Chris is co-author of the book “Stretch to Win”, co-founder of Fascial Stretch Therapy™ & lead instructor with Ann Frederick at the Stretch to Win Institute (http://www.StretchtoWin.com)

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Comments (3)

Royle-Guimaraes, Melissa | 02 Sep 2013, 12:53 PM

Could this help correct lateral pelvic tilt and how long/often would it need to be performed? I got somebody to do this on me as my pelvis is higher on the right and I have a lot of problems with squatting under load due to this. I definitely felt locked on both sides but a few hours later the right hip was painful in a way that felt it had been worked. I'm interested to see if this will help me and other clients with this issue long term. Thanks :)

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Frederick, Ann | 28 Jun 2013, 22:55 PM

Hi Serano,

Sorry it took so long to reply, anyway here is your question:

[I found this very interesting, so again, wait until after when you would normally "stretch out" a client. How would you approach to see if they have a length discrepency? just have them lay down & check yourself?]

It is said in orthopedics & physical therapy that the only way to accurately measure LLD (leg length discrepancy) is by x-ray. Clinically, it works well to correlate what you see standing with what you see supine and prone. But to give you something quick & easy:

- lie client supine on floor or table
- line up the legs so whole body is aligned
- put the edges of your thumbs under inner ankle bones (medial malleoli) & eyeball to see which is shorter.
- correlate that with if the short leg is also hypomobile (compared to the other leg) in the traction test in my video.
- if hypo, then do traction; if not, the LLD is coming from something else.

Thanks!
Chris Frederick
www.StretchToWin.com

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wilson, serano | 30 May 2013, 17:46 PM

Hi guys,

I found this very interesting, so again, wait until after when you would normally "stretch out" a client. How would you approach to see if they have a length discrepency? just have them lay down & check yourself?

Great video!

Be well,

Serano
www.moveyourbodyfitness.org

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