Piriformis Syndrome

by Brian Bradley |   Date Released : 14 Jun 2008
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Brian Bradley

About the author: Brian Bradley

Brian Bradley is the Vice President of Therapy Protocol for the Egoscue Method. Brian has over 19 years experience in the Fitness and Athletic Training industry. He speaks internationally on the topics of Posture, Pain and Performance and has treated clients such as Jack Welch, John Lynch, Jack Nicklaus and Anthony Robbins. Brian is the author of Egoscue Posture Solutions.

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Comments (3)

Bradley, Brian | 16 Jan 2010, 14:24 PM

Yes, the Piriformis can be the location of biomechanical dysfunction at the hip.
Yes, when a person sits chronically, they can have a greater chance to develop dysfunctional pelvic/hip mechanics.
Question: Why not bilateral piriformis symptoms? In almost all cases of piriformis symptoms, the client/patient complains of unilateral pain. Knowing this is the case, and they sit for a living, why not bilateral?
Answer: Because the piriformis is NOT the "problem"...its that simple.
Now, ART is amazing...so is MAT...so is Chiropractic Care...so is PT. All of these modalities must be accompanied with corrective e-cises that focus on the cause in order for the client/patient to "move on".
As stated before, if the functional line between the scap., the serratus anterior, external oblique, internal oblique, iliacus is re-established, the normal functional length and tension placed on the piriformis will be achieved.
The Result: Pain Free. If someone wanted to further their education along these lines, they could follow Pete Egoscue's work, Gray Cook's work, Vlad. Janda's work, and more importantly, Pavel Kolaj's.

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Bradley, Brian | 16 Jan 2010, 14:24 PM

Yes, the Piriformis can be the location of biomechanical dysfunction at the hip.
Yes, when a person sits chronically, they can have a greater chance to develop dysfunctional pelvic/hip mechanics.
Question: Why not bilateral piriformis symptoms? In almost all cases of piriformis symptoms, the client/patient complains of unilateral pain. Knowing this is the case, and they sit for a living, why not bilateral?
Answer: Because the piriformis is NOT the "problem"...its that simple.
Now, ART is amazing...so is MAT...so is Chiropractic Care...so is PT. All of these modalities must be accompanied with corrective e-cises that focus on the cause in order for the client/patient to "move on".
As stated before, if the functional line between the scap., the serratus anterior, external oblique, internal oblique, iliacus is re-established, the normal functional length and tension placed on the piriformis will be achieved.
The Result: Pain Free. If someone wanted to further their education along these lines, they could follow Pete Egoscue's work, Gray Cook's work, Vlad. Janda's work, and more importantly, Pavel Kolaj's.

Reply
Pastuch, Sean | 11 Oct 2009, 05:55 AM

As a chiropractor I treat piriformis syndrome on a weekly basis. usually I treat it for patients who come in with the assumption that their diagnosis is that of a lumbar disc radiculopathy that nothing else has worked for. Well, to put it simply, that's because they are quite often misdiagnosed by a "jump to conclusions MRI report".

Anyway, I'll get to my point. I disagree with the treatment protocol suggested in this article. Sure there are connections in the fascial trains from the scapula to the hip, but the piriformis can very often be a primary location of biomechanical dysfunction, which this article suggests is not the case. Techniques like ART (Active Release Technique) are very effective at quickly reversing the symptoms of piriformis syndrome. Most commonly however patients will need to alter their lifestyles to prevent a reoccurence. Piriformis syndrome is seen often in patients who sit a lot at their job, or even on the couch. It is also seen in anaerobic athletes due to the quick forceful load put on the muscle, and baseball pitchers in their drive leg due to external rotation when pushing off the rubber. SImple exercises like isometric internal rotation of the femur can reciprocally inhibit the piriformis and over time, cause the muscle to release and function properly.

Cat and camels are good exercises, but they will address the symptoms of increased disc viscocity that comes with poor movement in the spine, these exercises however, will not correct piriformis syndrome.

There is great l iterature out there on this topic by warren hammer and shirley sahrman for anyone who would like to take their education further.

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