Performance Training for Golf - Part 3

by Ben Shear |   Date Released : 15 Oct 2009
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Ben Shear

About the author: Ben Shear

Ben Shear is director of Performance at Athletic Edge Edge, a facility that has become one of the nation’s top spots for technologically-advanced teaching, testing and conditioning. His facility is ranked as one of the top six strength and conditioning destinations in the country by Rodale Press the Publishers of Men’s Health, Women’s Health, Runner’s World and Bicycle Magazines, to name just a few. Ben has been working with golfers for 10 years, including players from the PGA and European tours, numerous PGA teaching professionals and recreational and competitive amateurs of all levels. He is a graduate of Greg Roskopf’s Muscle Activation Technique, a Titleist Performance Institute (TPI) Certified Biomechanist and Level 3 Fitness Instructor and an Advanced Metabolic Typing Advisor. In addition, he has lectured to trainers from around the country on golf fitness, has been featured in The Met Golfer, the PGA of America's Professional Guide to Instruction and the New Jersey State Golf Association Magazine. He has presented on swing mechanics and performance training to the New Jersey State PGA as well as at the Better Golf Through Technology Conference at M.I.T. Ben has also been the fitness expert for njgolflinks.com and a contributing writer for NJ Golfer Magazine.

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Comments (3)

Laing, Christopher | 08 Dec 2009, 12:21 PM

Excellent article. I like the simplicity of this as sometimes trainers like to sound like molecular biologist and neuroscientists.

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Luffman, Peter | 29 Oct 2009, 13:17 PM

Excellent article, I have a possible client who is a professional golfer so this made interesting reading. I have been looking at programs for golfers and have identified the kettlebell to be a very effective tool for the job. The possible client has a prolapsed disc so I am dubious as to whether a kettlebell is the right thing for it. I know that kettlebells can help rehabilitate a back injury but I guess it depends on the severity of the injury?

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Gardner, Derek | 28 Oct 2009, 04:01 AM

This is a great article! I am a personal trainer, who also plays golf. I am always trying to find ways of getting my handicap down to the elusive single figure, and as such, I am always looking for advice and a good teacher. I have found the best teacher for me, but as I learn more about the technique of golf I realise that the physical side of golf is just as important. I want to specialise in 'Fitness for golfer' and this is the ideal article to get me motivated to learn as much as possible. Are there any other articles that the author can recommend to achieve this? I would be very interested to learn some more on this subject.

Derek Gardner

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