Dynamic Mobility Training

by Eric Cobb |   Date Released : 02 Mar 2007
Eric Cobb

About the author: Eric Cobb

The creator and co-founder of Z-Health, Dr. Eric Cobb is one of the world's leading experts in harnessing the power of the neurology of movement to create extraordinary change in the human body.

Dr. Cobb's innate passion for human physiology and psychology began when he was first introduced to the martial arts as a 6-year old boy. His passion for martial arts, and all things athletic, led him to dig deeply into the science of movement over the last 20 years. He has done extensive study in a variety of health and movement-related areas, including neurology, neurophysiology, pain management, nutrition and functional medicine, kinesiology, musculoskeletal trauma, and advanced soft tissue techniques.

At this point, he loves distilling dense scientific and academic work into informative, practical content that has the power to change lives.

In his 20 years in training, Dr. Cobb has developed a global and holistic approach to health and performance, based on the brain. He tailors his approach to each and every person that walks through his door -- but underlying everything he does is his deep-seated desire to help people realize the power they have to change, and then to help them find the tools and skills to unlock their potential.

Today, Dr. Cobb travels the country, teaching workshops and certification courses to everyone from stay-at-home moms to Olympic gold medalists. In addition, he and his team are constantly developing new products and training modalities to keep Z-Health current and engaging.

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Comments (9)

Edwards, Guy | 04 Oct 2010, 08:55 AM

To give a really simple examples of dynamic mobility training and how you can test using an effective assessment.

Pick a ROM test with strict form, such as shoulder flexion with strict straight elbow. Or hamstring forward bend with locked knees. Measure ROM.

Perform 5 ankle circles on each ankle slowly in each direction. 5-15 second circle. Retest. If the body had an increase ROM, then the specific drill that you picked was good for that specific athlete.

Most likely due to them having poor mobility previously in that movement of the ankle. If they had no improvement, likely they had little issue in that area.

You can take the same approach with any joint in the body. You just have to know how to isolate it and move it actively.

http://www.successfulhealth.co.uk

Reply
Edwards, Guy | 02 Oct 2010, 10:55 AM

To give a really simple examples of dynamic mobility training and how you can test using an effective assessment.

Pick a ROM test with strict form, such as shoulder flexion with strict straight elbow. Or hamstring forward bend with locked knees. Measure ROM.

Perform 5 ankle circles on each ankle slowly in each direction. 5-15 second circle. Retest. If the body had an increase ROM, then the specific drill that you picked was good for that specific athlete.

Most likely due to them having poor mobility previously in that movement of the ankle. If they had no improvement, likely they had little issue in that area.

You can take the same approach with any joint in the body. You just have to know how to isolate it and move it actively.

http://www.successfulhealth.co.uk

Reply
Gamble, Lee | 21 Aug 2010, 07:40 AM

This seems to be all set-up, no pay-off!

Would love to see an article that gives us the tools to act on such a compelling argument for 'mobility'.

Reply
Alogla, April | 10 Aug 2010, 16:58 PM

great article! but its so so so so frustrating that there are no examples. I feel like you've left me here hanging!

Reply
Charlesworth, Jonathan | 19 May 2010, 15:25 PM

i must say that it is great to get a clearer definition of the word""mobolity"with regards to training

Reply
Bryant, Rick | 07 Apr 2010, 11:32 AM

Quality, thought provoking article that I hope Eric will expandon in the future. I agree that examples of isolated mobility assessment and training would expand the scope of this article.

Reply
charlesworth, larena | 04 Sep 2009, 04:31 AM

I agree with Jasmin, examples of the isolated mobility training would help assist the explanation. A great article in questioning the traditional understanding and definition of Mobility.

Reply
frydman, Jasmin | 27 Jul 2009, 06:46 AM

Great article - I have had a lot of discussios around dynamic moblity for 'beginners' and agree with the article completely. The only thing I would add is - some examles of 'isolated mobility' and some examples of client's assessments.

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Taylor, Merle | 04 Jun 2009, 06:48 AM

Great article

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